Thoughts: I’m an alien and proud to be one

I'm an alien

Author’s Notes: Alienated. It’s no longer a word in common use. Strange. At a time when many feel alien in their own world and many others are being excluded if not eliminated for being ‘alien’. Estranged, disconnected, mad even, yet seeing things differently can have its advantages, especially for writers and other artists.

(…) Rather than berating ourselves for our foreignness and suffering at being different or worrying we are going crazy, why not relish the strength and the heightened discernment that feeling alien brings… ( read on)

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Short story: Being English

As I finish the layout of my new book, Stories People Tell and embark on the final re-read before sending the book to the printers, I wrote a new short piece entitled Being English.

Being English

The Politics of Elimination

Stories People Tell front cover

A systematic striving to eliminate as a solution to problems is a self-defeating, reckless if not unhinged way of behaving…
The Politics of Elimination, Alan McCluskey

Read more about the politics of elimination and its depiction in Stories People Tell In Author’s Notes.

The politics of elimination

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Stories People Tell – Cover and sample chapters

Stories People Tell

A sneak peek at the cover of Stories People Tell a new novel by Alan McCluskey is now available as well as four sample chapters. The book will be published early 2018.

Stories People Tell

Annie, a seventeen-year-old schoolgirl, wasn’t looking for love or notoriety when she got swept up in ‘London Whatever’, a grassroots movement offering support and healthcare to gay girls and women. Yet in the struggle to end violence against women she stumbled on the love of her life and grew to be a key public figure. The movement bore the brunt of homophobic attacks from Nolan Kard, Lord Mayor of London. Rich entrepreneur turned politician known for his off-hand attitude and tasteless humour, he campaigned to ‘Keep London Straight’. Annie became his number one target and that of his rogue police, not to mention his sinister gang of ghostwriters, the nightmare of all his enemies.

Stories to make sense of the world

Stories to make sense of the world

Author’s Notes: We make sense of the world by continually spinning stories about it. Stories? They are not the kind you would necessarily tell someone. Unvoiced, they are very often little more than fragments but are generally in tune with a larger personal narrative. That overarching narrative may be composed of distinct parts which don’t need to be coherent with each other. It is as if we need to fit events into a coherent narrative, at least ‘locally’, if we don’t want to blow a mental fuse. We are comforted and strengthened by them. These everyday fragments can be so tiny and the making of them so natural, we are often unaware we are drafting them. This narrative sense-making may become abruptly apparent when our stories are at odds with those of others and conflict ensues… (Click below to read the full article and to listen to the author reading his text.)

Stories to make sense of the world